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Thread: how does one figure out how much electricity savings they may have?

  1. #1
    Tony Fracasso - Admin
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    how does one figure out how much electricity savings they may have?

    I'm taking some old equipment off line Nov 30th.

    120V 2 amps
    120V 2 amps
    120V .5 amps
    120V 1.2 amps
    120V .5 amps

    The equipment generates heat so the is also less cooling going to be required and runs 24/7

    no where on our electric bill does it say "you are charged X per kilowatt per hour"...

    I found some stuff on the internet but my numbers are coming out a little high.

  2. #2
    Member fiona's Avatar
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    ~120v * 6.2 amps = ~740 watts power consumption.

    740 watts * 24 hours = 17.7 kWH/day

    p = cost per KWH in cents

    17.7 * p = daily savings in cents

    If your cost per KWH is 10 cents then your savings is about $1.77 a day or $53 per month.
    Meow, baby

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    Good reply, Fiona.

    Our kwh cost here in WNY is more like 23 cents for residential when you figure in the delivery charge and taxes.

    Tony has a business and his costs are higher.

  4. #4
    Tony Fracasso - Admin
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    From what I found on the web, electricity is about .18 per kw in NYS

    I'm finally turning off our dial up equipment. I was subsidizing the operational cost with revenue from the web hosting we do. I wasn't even factoring in electrical usage when I was taking revenue generated versus PRI line cost etc.

    We just took advantage of a rebate the electric company was offering to upgrade all the lighting fixtures here to new electronic ballast/T8 bulbs. ROI for that should be 9 months because the electric company covers, get this, 70% of the cost to do the upgrade. I figured with the 10,000's of dollars I have paid Nationgrid/Nimo getting some of my money back wasn't a bad thing.

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    Don't worry Tony, NIMO didn't give that 70%, it was paid for hy higher rates, and higher taxes... the Federal govt was the one funding it... AKA YOU!
    "I know you guys enjoy reading my stuff because it all makes sense. "

    Dumbest post ever! Thanks for the laugh PO!

  6. #6
    Tony Fracasso - Admin
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    I know that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WNYresident View Post
    From what I found on the web, electricity is about .18 per kw in NYS
    Look at your electric bill.

    Divide the total amount by the amount of number of kw hours you used that month.

    (My example: Total bill= $41.88 (yes I am frugal) /186 kwh = 0.22516129 per kwh.)

    Fuuny thing is the actual power cost of this bill was only $9.05, the rest was "delivery" charges, tax and "fees".

    That is your cost.

    Please post your results!

    What you found on the wide, wide world of web was the basic price per kwh, less "delivery" charges and various taxes and fees.

    Git 'er done!
    Last edited by Effigy; November 15th, 2010 at 08:03 PM.

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    Member fiona's Avatar
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    You can't just divide the entire bill by the number of KWH you use. Any flat fees should be added up to form a "base price" per month and then any per KWH hour charges added together for the cost per KWH.

    For every 8.3 amps, you're pulling about a kW of power. 8.3 amps for one hour = 1 kWH. Multiply your KWH's times the KWH charges and then add your base cost to that for your total bill.

    It's not rocket science.
    Meow, baby

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    Member nickelcityhomes's Avatar
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    I'm running around $300 per month for a 1100 square foot ranch with gas heat and appliances.

    Last month I switched to a butane ignition bong instead of electronic power, and the wife unit started using solar powered rechargeable batteries for her vibrator, but it hasn't made a dent. The treadmill is in the process of being retrofitted for energy output so the kids can make a contribution after school. I figure 5-10 miles per child should reduce the bills by 10%.
    Most of all I like bulldozers and dirt

  10. #10
    Tony Fracasso - Admin
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    This is cool:

    Watt meter

    It seems to work... It was on sale at radio shack for about 22 bucks. I wanted to really see what electrical savings I was going to gain with less or newer equipment. Gotta see what the ROI is.

    Someone suggested to see what our TV used if any when turned off...



    Watts


    39 watts with the master switch turned off on the power strip. With the power strip switch on it was drawing 58 watts....
    Some of the outlets are non-switched. Adds up over time. I didn't realize how much was being wasted.

    The 22watt flourscent desk light reads out 19-20 watts. 39 watts is like leaving two desk lamps on 24/7

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    You haven't answered my question.

  12. #12
    Member gorja's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Effigy:
    Look at your electric bill.

    Divide the total amount by the amount of number of kw hours you used that month.

    (My example: Total bill= $41.88 (yes I am frugal) /186 kwh = 0.22516129 per kwh.)

    Fuuny thing is the actual power cost of this bill was only $9.05, the rest was "delivery" charges, tax and "fees".
    Your supply charges are alot cheaper than mine
    I've got NYSEG with NYSEG solutions as my supplier. My total bill was $54.01. $54.01/394 kwh= .1370812 per kwh

    My power alone was 394 * .0646= $25.45

    Who is your supplier?


  13. #13
    Tony Fracasso - Admin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Effigy View Post
    You haven't answered my question.
    It's sort of tough to figure out. We go through a third party supplier. We get one bill from them and another from the electric company. When the next bills come in I'll ad them both up plus TAXES and divid it by the kilo watts we use to see what the cost per kilowatt is.

  14. #14
    Member NBuffaloResident's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WNYresident View Post
    I'm taking some old equipment off line Nov 30th.

    120V 2 amps
    120V 2 amps
    120V .5 amps
    120V 1.2 amps
    120V .5 amps

    The equipment generates heat so the is also less cooling going to be required and runs 24/7

    no where on our electric bill does it say "you are charged X per kilowatt per hour"...

    I found some stuff on the internet but my numbers are coming out a little high.
    'Res, you need to look into covering to 220V. Lots of cost savings in there, since it requires less power.

    But your bill should let you know how much you pay per kW/h... If not, call the electric company.
    Raptor Jesus: He went extinct for your sins.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by WNYresident View Post
    It's sort of tough to figure out. We go through a third party supplier. We get one bill from them and another from the electric company. When the next bills come in I'll ad them both up plus TAXES and divid it by the kilo watts we use to see what the cost per kilowatt is.
    Thanks, T! I'm looking forward to your results.

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