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Thread: Small water damage to drywall and wall trim

  1. #1
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    Small water damage to drywall and wall trim

    About a few months ago I had some water damage, about 1/4 of an inch. It did manage to get to the trim causing the trim/wall to absorb the water. I did all the tricks, fans, bleach, then the mold control spray. It dryed out well actually. But the water absorbed up about 10 inches and left a water stain mark. The trim dryed out and cracked. There is no smell, or black discoloration. The effected area is just in a corner spot about 10 inches.

    Question since I did all the mold control applications, can I now go ahead and paint over that? Is there something else I need to do before I do that, or do I have to replace the trim and part of the drywall?

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    Update

    I have left this affect area alone for the duration to see what would happen with the heat on. The wall has bowed a bit, the trim is dried out and cracked, there is a separation between the trim cuts.

    So now that there appears to be no apparent black discoloration or scent of any kind (mold-odors), I plan on going ahead and re-do the trim, spackle and re-paint.

    Concern:

    The wall is bowed. Anyone have a suggestion on what I should do?

  3. #3
    Member Riven37's Avatar
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    You can cut out the effective section , replace it with a fresh cut wall board section, putty up with proper wall board bond, tape, nail, and paint. If you canít do it hire someone shouldnít cost you much But if you let it go its not what you see, its what you donít see that could be a bigger problem for you later on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riven37 View Post
    You can cut out the effective section , replace it with a fresh cut wall board section, putty up with proper wall board bond, tape, nail, and paint. If you can’t do it hire someone shouldn’t cost you much But if you let it go its not what you see, its what you don’t see that could be a bigger problem for you later on.
    Thanks riven, I think that has to be the solution, my concern is the bowing of the wall, so it might require cutting up farther. It is in a small area where there is a corner that butts up to it. It might be a bigger problem.

    What would I not see that would be a big problem later on? Mold?

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    My project is going to be a winter project. I need to address this issue, the wall will require some needed restoration and new trim. I am smelling some odd kind of odor and I am beginning to think that mold might be present.

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    Member granpabob's Avatar
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    The wall bowed because the side you can see dried out faster then the side facing the basement wall. It could still be damp and mold could start. Riven is right the only good solution is to replace the warped section. you can use a magnet to find the existing dry wall nails then cut out the bad section down the center of a stud. I make my first cut on the side of the stud towards the damaged section then trim to the center of the stud. a little drywall tape and some mud will cover the crack. should only take an hour or so to do
    One good thing about growing old is your secrets are safe with your friends they can't remember them either

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    Member FMD's Avatar
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    If your replacing a piece, be sure to make your patches atleast 6" past the hole, or it will show.

    Best to use durabond first coat (brown bag, $12 @ Home Depot)
    Then lay fiber glass mesh in the wet mud use a knife to smooth it out.

    After it sets... (goes hard) apply 2 coats of drywall compound, eith premixed (green bucket) or the white bag.

    Make your dry mix, the consistancy of browning mix. Dont over work the material or it will lump up on you.

    Once this is done, sand smooth.

    Then prime with ALCOHOL based primer, like Bin, or an Oil base primer like Kilz or Problock. The oil/alcohol primer is an ABSOLUTE must!! There isnt a latex primer on the market that will hide a water stain for long.

    Then, when you go to paint the wall with LATEX, be sure to again prime the affected area with your wall color, the reroll the whole wall. Then, cut and roll the wall for a second coat, skipping priming.

    Be sure to touch up the patch after the first prime. and sand smooth. Be sure to get the correct drywall thickness or itll show.

    While you have the hole open, spray bleach behind the wall.

    Dont forget to wear a dust mask.
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    Member FMD's Avatar
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    In the future, use a screw driver, to poke a hoke in whatever appears to be leaking, especially on ceilings! If you notice drips on a ceiling, you absolutely need to poke a hole in it, and let the water out, or you will have a big expensive repair bill.
    Willful ignorance is the downfall of every major empire in history.

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    Member HipKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FMD View Post
    If your replacing a piece, be sure to make your patches atleast 6" past the hole, or it will show.

    Best to use durabond first coat (brown bag, $12 @ Home Depot)
    Then lay fiber glass mesh in the wet mud use a knife to smooth it out.

    After it sets... (goes hard) apply 2 coats of drywall compound, eith premixed (green bucket) or the white bag.

    Make your dry mix, the consistancy of browning mix. Dont over work the material or it will lump up on you.

    Once this is done, sand smooth.

    Then prime with ALCOHOL based primer, like Bin, or an Oil base primer like Kilz or Problock. The oil/alcohol primer is an ABSOLUTE must!! There isnt a latex primer on the market that will hide a water stain for long.

    Then, when you go to paint the wall with LATEX, be sure to again prime the affected area with your wall color, the reroll the whole wall. Then, cut and roll the wall for a second coat, skipping priming.

    Be sure to touch up the patch after the first prime. and sand smooth. Be sure to get the correct drywall thickness or itll show.

    While you have the hole open, spray bleach behind the wall.

    Dont forget to wear a dust mask.
    I'd use Kilz, since it's the best against mold, and the rest is spot on
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    Awesome guys, that is a huge help. When I addressed the affected area initially I did use bleach to cleanse the area. Then I used the Home Depot product to spray along the same area. After the drying timeframe took place it has now been a year and a couple of months.

    The process sounds good, the use of alcohol primer is something I didn't factor in. I know that the primer is important. Great advice. I want to reuse the trim, which is bowed but I think it can be nailed back into place. I though I might use the flex caulking to prevent it from expanding. It is an outer wall and the trim seems to expand during the winter months.

    Thanks guys for the great advice!

  11. #11
    Member granpabob's Avatar
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    your trim should shrink during the winter when the furnace is pumping dry air into the house, if it is expanding in the winter you must have moisture getting into the basement some where. A quick fix is a dehumidifier to help the furnace dry the basement.
    One good thing about growing old is your secrets are safe with your friends they can't remember them either

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    cool thread, bob that is correct.
    do all homes have to have dehumidifiers now incorporated into the furnace?

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    Member granpabob's Avatar
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    Not sure if they require one . but water is a by product of heating air. the steam that used to go up your chimney now has to go somewhere. my furnace has a small pump and hose that empties the water reservoir into my deep sink. but I still need a dehumidifier to rid the basement of extra humidity.
    One good thing about growing old is your secrets are safe with your friends they can't remember them either

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    thx bob.

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    So the contractor has tackled this project today, and what was discovered was not good news. Mold and decayed wood. He ripped the trim, cut into the drywall and found between the studs pooled water. So now we think there might be water coming in from the exterior of the house.

    It looks like the studs might be alright but are wet. The particle board is saturated also which is the exterior of the house that has that sheathing and siding on.

    WHAT a mess!!!! The fiberglass was saturated too!! ugh...

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